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poppy flower


poppy flower
写真に関する情報
著作権: Marjan Gresl (marjan) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 462 W: 14 N: 366] (2689)
ジャンル: Plants
メディア: カラー
撮影した年: 2010-03-25
カテゴリー: Flowers
カメラ: Panasonic TZ10
Photo Version: Original Version
アップロードした日: 2010-06-09 5:14
ページビュー: 4627
ポイント: 2
[Note Guidelines] アーティストからのコメント
Papaver rhoeas (common names include corn poppy, corn rose, field poppy, Flanders poppy, red poppy, and red weed) is a species of flowering plant in the poppy family, Papaveraceae. This poppy, a native of Europe, is notable as an agricultural weed (hence the "corn" and "field") and as a symbol of fallen soldiers.

P. rhoeas sometimes is so abundant in agricultural fields that it may be mistaken for a crop. The only species of Papaveraceae grown as a field crop on a large scale is Papaver somniferum, the opium poppy.During World War I corn poppies bloomed in waste grounds of much of the Western front, where they provided a vivid reminder of the bloody battles that had so recently taken place there. The corn poppy is immortalized in the poem In Flanders Fields by Canadian poet John McCrae. Similarly, it is a symbol of the blood of Polish soldiers killed in the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Polish war song Czerwone maki na Monte Cassino (Red Poppies on Monte Cassino).

The corn poppy has become a cultural icon to military veterans, especially veterans of World War I, and has become associated with wartime remembrance, especially during Remembrance Day or Anzac Day in Commonwealth countries. In Canada, where the corn poppy is largely associated with Remembrance Day, the Canadian Mint in 2004 released into circulation a quarter with a commemorative reverse featuring a corn poppy colored red.

This poppy is a common weed in Europe and is found in many locations, including Flanders Fields. Canadian surgeon and soldier, John McCrae wrote the poem In Flanders Fields on May 3, 1915, after witnessing the death of his friend, Lt. Alexis Helmer. The opening line of the poem vividly depicts corn poppies blowing in the wind amongst the many crosses that mark the resting places of fallen soldiers.


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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Marjan,
you captured this poppy so sharp and with brilliant colours. I also love the light and the nice glance on the petals. Good POV from above, very well done my friend, thanks
Sabine - wishnugaruda

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